Out now: Carl Stone – We Jazz Reworks, Vol. 2

We Jazz Records presents the second volume of their reworks albums dealing with source material from the Helsinki-based label’s catalog. This time around, it’s Carl Stone’s turn to tackle the source albums at hand and filter the label’s output through his musical lens.

We Jazz Reworks is an idea that repurposes some of the label’s output 10 albums at a time. That is, the label invites producers whose music they love on board, and one by one, they tackle 10 albums worth of source material, of which they are free to use as much or as little as they choose. The series evolves chronologically, so this volume being number two, the source material is pulled from We Jazz LPs numbers 11 through 20. The artist has complete freedom.

Volume 2 in the series happens with Carl Stone, a legendary figure in creative music. His career spans decades of unlimited musical innovation. Stone’s recent output on Unseen Worlds, the label who has also been instrumental in issuing some of his remarkable earlier work, ranks among the most original art of our time and renders notions such as “genre” virtually meaningless.

Here, We Jazz originals by Terkel Nørgaard, OK:KO, Jonah Parzen-Johnson and more are met here with a fresh sense of discovery, spun around and delivered ready for the turntable once again.

Carl Stone says:

“It was wonderful that We Jazz gave me carte blanche to work with any materials from the set of ten releases in its catalog. This freedom to work with everything could have been a mixed blessing though, as it could be a challenge to try to deal with so much musical information. In the end I did what I almost always do: Let my intuition be my guide and to seize upon any musical items that seemed to fit into an overall approach.”

“To make a new piece I usually start with an extended period of what really is just playing, the way a child plays with toys. Experimentation without necessary expectation, leading to (hopefully) discovery of things of musical interest, then figuring out a way to craft and shape these into a structured piece of music. Each track uses a different approach, which I found along the way during this play period.”

This conceptual approach becomes complete with the design, in which album graphics are treated in a similar fashion, reworking what’s there. This time around, the artwork is reinvented by Tuomo Parikka, a regular cover collage contributor for the We Jazz Magazine.

CURACAO BLUE TRANSPARENT VINYL, INSIDE OUT SLEEVE, OBI W/ LINER NOTES, PRINTED INNER SLEEVE WITH SOURCE ALBUM DESIGN REFLECTIONS.


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Now On Sale – Listen Here

There’s a dizzying good new @carlstone album coming on May 20; it’s no spoiler to say that admirers of Stone’s jumpy digital pop fantasias should not hesitate. Steve Smith, Night After Night

Wat Dong Moon Lek is Stone’s latest distinctive, Characterful, and playful take on sound collage, a followup equal to 2020’s thrilling Stolen Car…There is an infinite quality to the work…much alchemy here, each track feeling fizzy and alive with potential directions. There are so many moments that make me want to dance, or stand up and applaud. It’s clever, effervescent and gloriously fun. – The Wire, June 2022 issue

https://unseenworlds.bandcamp.com/album/wat-dong-moon-lek

 

 

New Album Preorder Switched ON – Listen Here

New Carl Stone album coming soon! The We Jazz label in Finland turned Carl loose in their archives for some of his patented sampling psychosis. Carte blanche y’all! The release is a curacao blue transparent vinyl edition. Inside out matte sleeve, corner OBI with liner notes, inner sleeve with source album design reflections.
Your order of We Jazz Reworks Vol. 2. gets you 1 track now (streaming via the free Bandcamp app and also available as a high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more), plus the complete album the moment it’s released in October.

Full Review of HIMALAYA in The Wire’s December 2019 Issue

Carl Stone made the wise decision to split his latest creations over several releases.

Carl Stone Himalaya Unseen Worlds CD/DL/2xLP

 

It takes 35 minutes to reach the summit of Carl Stone’s new Himalaya. To arrive there, you ascend through manically cut up and overlaid Afrobeats, funk and hiphop grooves together with a tasty disco riff that reassembles the very molecules of your being. Then, having hit the apex, Stone throws you into idyllic freefall for the next half hour, into a balmy environment of slow moving and ethereal tones, music that is as voluminous and prayer-like as the opening part is compacted and hedonistic.

The relationship between Himalaya and Stone’s release from earlier this year, Baroo, mirrors that between Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew and In A Silent Way – the later album building on the textural and harmonic palette of all that went before, while clawing open fresh expressive possibilities. The opening piece “Han Yan” tells you what to expect as high-speed Afrobeats hallucinate on their own existence. Musically, two things are happening. Stone has the beats on intense fast-forward, while little microedits snip out crucial supporting notes in the harmony, which spins the music relentlessly forwards – it has no brakes.

A strutting rock beat kick-starts “Bia Bia” before it lurches towards ebullient chaos, with broken-up trumpet fanfares randomly puncturing the texture like Lester Bowie is wandering in and out of earshot. “Kikanbou” is grounded by a mesmeric disco beat that keeps rolling for 17 minutes, a motor around which auxiliary beats circle. Around the six minute mark, and for no other reason than he can, Stone suddenly turns everything upside down and inside out, and upside out and downside up, leaving beats coiling in other directions and soaring upwards. The world’s pop music has become putty in Stone’s hands. Each piece could, in theory, keep reassembling its particles infinitely. But Stone applies his composerly voice with a noticeably light touch, making conscious decisions about his material without ever suffocating its freedom.

Had he signed off after “Kikanbou” Himalaya would still have been exceptional, but the final glide through spacious textures and rarefied tunings – leading towards intonations from the Japanese vocalist Akaihirume – reconnects your soul with the stuff of sound itself as you ruminate on an epic journey, both exhilarating and affecting.

Philip Clark

The Wire December 2019

The Wire’s review of Himalaya, my latest release

Happy to report, The Wire’s review of Himalaya, my latest release, is pretty much a rave.


Excerpt: It takes 35 minutes to reach the summit of Carl Stone’s new Himalaya. To arrive there, you ascend through manically cut up and overlaid Afrobeats, funk and hiphop grooves together with a tasty disco riff that reassembles the very molecules of your being. Then, having hit the apex, Stone throws you into idyllic freefall for the next half hour, into a balmy environment of slow moving and ethereal tones, music that is as voluminous and prayer-like as the opening part is compacted and hedonistic.
The relationship between Himalaya and Stone’s release from earlier this year, Baroo, mirrors that between Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew and In A Silent Way – the later album building on the textural and harmonic palette of all that went before, while clawing open fresh expressive possibilities.

You can read the entire review here, or of course in The Wire’s December 2019 issue.

BANDCAMP:

https://unseenworlds.bandcamp.com/album/himalaya

https://unseenworlds.bandcamp.com/album/baroo

APPLE MUSIC

https://music.apple.com/us/album/himalaya/1473870763

https://music.apple.com/us/album/baroo/1452006426

Two Releases Now Out on Unseen Worlds


Two albums just released on CD. HIMALAYA, the newest of them (featuring title track with @akaihirume), is now out on CD and DIGITAL formats. BAROO joins the physical realm today on CD, as well. Both HIMALAYA and BAROO have delicious vinyl platters forthcoming. Please enjoy this first course… artwork by Sam Lubicz

“Stone makes music that can hit your ear holes like a DMT flash.”
– Richard Gehr, Relix

“Stone is still ahead of the game when it comes to his knack for discovering a world of music in a grain of sound.” – Julian Cowley, The Wire

“It’s another hall of mirrors but this time, its every surface is in a packed lysergic night club. Strings stretched, fragments jackhammer, and thick synthetic arcs swarm….Stone is on fire here” – John J Nicol, Obladada

https://unseenworlds.bandcamp.com/album/himalaya
https://unseenworlds.bandcamp.com/album/baroo