January 11 9AM & 9PM Eastern World-Wide via Internet Red Bull Radio


Thursday January 11 2018 9AM & 9PM Eastern
My Fireside Chat w/ Mark ‘Frosty’ McNeill is premiering on Red Bull Radio next Thursday, Jan 11th, 9 AM EST and will re-run at 9 PM EST, as well as several other times over the next couple of weeks.

Summary of times:
USA West Coast: January 11 at 6AM and 6PM
USA East Coast: January 11 at 9AM and 9PM
Central Europe: January 11 at 15h00 and January 12 at 03h00
Japan: January 11 at 23h00 and January 12 at 11h00

You can check the current schedule here: https://www.redbullradio.com/schedule .

After the Thursday premiere the show will be available to listen to on-demand (outside the US) under the direct link:
https://www.redbullradio.com/shows/fireside-chat/episodes/carl-stone

It is always fun to be on the interviewee side of the microphone. Please try to tune in!

Red Bull Radio

World-Wide via Internet

https://www.redbullradio.com/

January 28 open 16h30 start 17h00 Numazu Shizuoka Numazu RACOON East Meets West Meets Midwest w/Pearl Alexander, Dai Matsuoka & Anna Irite

Sunday January 28 2018 open 16h30 start 17h00
カールとパール (Carl Stone and Pearl Alexander) join with butoh artist Dai Matsuoka (Sankaijuku) and dancer Anna Irite in a vast indoor space on the Shizuoka coast, for a first time collaboration and what promises to be a memorable event.

Artists:

  • Carl Stone (laptop)
  • Pearl Alexander (contrabass)
  • Dai Matsuoka (butoh)
  • Anna Irite (dance)

Advance: ¥3000 Same Day: ¥4000

Numazu RACOON
Otemachi 3-4-1 Numazu City Shizuoka (1 minute from JR Numazu Station)
Numazu Shizuoka

http://scalelabo.jp/ewmw/
https://reserva.be/360marimba

March 2 8 PM Brooklyn NY Issue Project Room w/Ned Rothenberg & Ami Yamasaki


Friday March 2 2018 8 PM
Carl Stone, composer/performer Ned Rothenberg, and Tokyo-based vocalist Ami Yamasaki perform in an evening of overlapping improvisations. While Stone & Rothenberg have performed together previously in Japan over their 35 year-long friendship, this is their debut New York performance.

Artists:

  • Carl Stone
  • Ned Rothenberg
  • Ami Yamasaki

$15 ($12 IPR members)

Issue Project Room
22 Boerum Place, Brooklyn NY
Brooklyn NY
718-330-0313
Map (English) at here
info@issueprojectroom.org
http://issueprojectroom.org/event/carl-stone-ned-rothenberg-ami-yamasaki
http://issueprojectroom.org/events

The Wire Reviews Realistic Monk at Cafe Oto for its Historic 400th Issue

“Drones and soundscapes in the cosy interior of Cafe Oto are the ideal counterpoint to a dank early spring afternoon in London, but the real draw that’s brought so many out are solo and combined performances by two innovating musicians…put the two together, the soft and subtle crafting of Miki Yui and the popped out veins of Carl Stone’s heavyweight sample manipulations and you have Realistic Monk, the unlikely two halves of a circle.”

Read the full review here

Go to The Wire here

Holy smokes! You can download the entire set here

Zurkonic Reviews Our Brooklyn Concert March 2017

“I’ve never been moved to jump out of my seat at the end of the performance but I’ll be damned if I didn’t even realize I was standing until I had been clapping rapturously along with the rest of the crowd for a couple minutes.

“The show’s last piece would be the one that solidified Stone as a master of the craft. What unfolded onstage was both sonically accessible and temporally exhaustive as the singer (Akaihirume) and the composer entered into what could be described as an esoteric and aural courting dance that entranced the entire audience.

“I’ve never been one to really romanticize the idea of traveling with a band around the country, but if Carl Stone ever gets the mainstream recognition that elder statesmen like Steve Reich and Philip Glass enjoy, then I might find myself on some strange trip to have my preconceptions about music challenged at every chance.”

Read the full review here.

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Latest Release Gets Picked by The Wire as Best Album of the Year 2016 (Archival Category)

wire-magazine-rewind-2016

“West Coast composer Carl Stone was one of the first to plug in to the possibilities of digital synthesizers, samplers and effects. Electronic Music included “Shibucho”, an audacious sample flip of The Temptations’ My Girl that connects Steve Reich’s Come Out to Chicago footwork, and two explorations of the possibilities of the Buchla synth. Julian Cowley said “While Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa were flamboyantly promoting sample based hip-hop, and Joh Oswald was openly flaunting the art of plunderphonics, Carl Stone developed his own idiosyncratic take on sonic bricolage.”

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Boomkat Loves Our New Release and Makes Us Laugh Telling Us So

“lights up our pleasure centres like a quid in a fruit machine, using a palette of eastern-tuned scales, processed vocals and pop samples to conjure a majorly playful array of idiosyncratic, angular and intriguing arrangements that resonate with Robert Ashley’s mercurial cut-ups as much as The Automatics Group’s incisive dance pop detournements and the proto-glitch music of Nicolas Collins. 

It’s all totally new to us and feels like somebody just opened a big skylight onto our listening lives, flooding us with new sensations between the baroque computer music of Sukhothai (1977) and the wormholing drone of Chao Praya (1973), taking in the soothingly ethereal Shing Kee (1986) and strobing structure of Don II Jang (1982), along with the haunting nocturnal transition of Kuk Il Kwan (1981) to lay out whole new worlds before your ears.”

You can read the full review here

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Our Latest Release Score’s Bandcamp’s “Best of Contemporary Classical” November 2016

“This astounding anthology collects two-and-a-half hours of the early electronic experiments of Carl Stone, an L.A. composer who studied under Morton Subotnick and James Tenney and worked with Buchla synthesizers back in the ‘70s before finding his true passion: a kind of experimental sampling approach that presaged the developments of folks like John “Plunderphonics” Oswald and Paul Lansky. There are a couple of those early analog synth pieces—thick, long tone drones—made as a student at Cal Arts, included, but the real thrills come from the sample-based work. Stone’s work relied on tape machines, building layer after layer of the same passage of music—like the minute or so of Renaissance harpsichord music in “Sukothai” that folds in on itself until there are 1024 simultaneous layers of the music piled up, and rhythms disappear in a buzzing haze of abstract sound. Towards the end of 1982, he began working with the now-primitive Publison stereo digital delay unit to create dizzying hall-of-mirrors refractions built from tiny fragments of Asian pop, American R&B and classical records that he manipulated with a maniacal rigor to generate sound profiles that drifted toward fleeting recognizability—such as the lick of “My Girl” in “Shibucho”—before pushing off into different chopped-up patterns. Today’s technology could tackle these time-consuming time experiments with ease, but Stone’s resourcefulness and originality is unmistakable, and these sounds remain fresh decades later.”

Bandcamp is a global community where millions of fans discover new music, and directly connect with and fairly compensate the artists who make it. Their mission is to provide all artists with a sustainable platform to distribute their music, while making it easy for fans to directly support the artists they love. This review is from the Best of Bandcamp Contemporary Classical: November 2016 listings

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Textura Reviews Our New 3-LP Release

“The only prosaic thing about Electronic Music from the Seventies and Eighties is its title. Otherwise, the eight pieces (one a digital-only bonus) on this three-LP collection of pioneering work by American electro-acoustic composer Carl Stone constitute an oft-mesmerizing two-and-a-half hours; in fact, of the seven album tracks, five are so extensively explored they each take up a full album side. What makes the release especially significant for students of electronic music’s history and development is that all are previously unpublished pieces, the sole exception being “Shing Kee,” which surfaced on a 1992 New Albion CD release.”

Full review here

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